Wifi Channels

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Spidey01
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Wifi Channels

Does anyone know effect using a diffrent channel has on the speed/range/interfernce on 802.11 Wireless networking?

My router supports channels 1-11 (2.412-2.462 Ghz) 802.11b/g.

I currently have it set to channel 6, as 11 causes a great deal of problems with our 2.4Ghz cordless "giga" phone.

Even without a degree in Radio Techology I get the idea of the major changes in freq. But how much diffrence can 50Mhz make to an internet connection ~10m away ???

SAS_En4cer
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Spidey,

The changes in the WIFI channel would be the same as changing the channels on your TV. For WIFI and most other brands of radio wave transmitters a change in channel represents a change in the band wave emitted. The higher the frequency the longer the arc in the band wave... which means that a higher frequency channel travels with different characteristics... which is why sometimes changing the channel on your WIFI will work... same as changing the channel on the cordless phone works too.

Some frequencies are more affected by interference then others. To get a full understanding.. pick up a book about Ham Radio Operators... it goes into great detail about how changes in frequency will change the band wave characteristics and therefore alter the transmission qualities of the signal... however one must also factor in the power of the transmission and the type of weather it is transmitted through.

Basically, on your internet WIFI base transmitter... each channel has the same amount of power when used.. the difference in channels is there to offer you a chance to minimize conflict and interference between your WIFI and the other electronics in your house.

Since your WIFI emitter has 11 channels that range from 2.412 - 2.462 Ghz you can see that the actual change in radio band will be very minimal to affect the overall travel of the wave.. but it may be just large enough to prevent the Phone, Microwave, AM-FM Radio or other such household electronics from corrupting or distorting your signal quality.

For each of those 11 channels.. you will not see a difference in power emitted nor will you see a gain of distance the wave travels... you will only see that perhaps one of those channels is less effected by the electronics of your household... so trial and error are the key... you may find several that work great.. or that none of the channels stands out.. performance wise...

Hope this helps a bit...

[color=yellow][SAS] 22nd E.V.R. - SAS_VET_EN4CER /[color] Virtus Disciplina Unitas

SAS_JB
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My basic rule of thumb is: the greater the frequency, the greater the loss and vice/versa the lower the frequency the less the loss. Imagine one set for the "T" or sub-vhf band (5 - 40 MHz).

Spidey01
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Last seen: 1 year 10 months ago

Thank you en4cer