useless geek trivial: 1234567890 day

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Spidey01
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useless geek trivial: 1234567890 day

At 2009-02-13T23:31:30Z

That is, 13 Feb. 2009 at 11:31 PM and 30 seconds UTC/GMT, to some of you; Feb. 13 2009 at 11:31 PM and 30 seconds UTC/GMT to others, and go get a date/time convertor for the rest of y'all. The numerical representation used internally by most Unix systems to denote the current date and time, will read 1234567890 decimal, and if I'm correct: 499602d2 hex, 11145401322 octal, and 1001001100101100000001011010010 binary. In effect, the unix based machines that make so much of the internet go round, their clocks will read "1234567890" if you count by 10s.

Most Computer Operating Systems I know of, count the seconds since midnight of a date of interest to the developers or the userbase, then convert that to the date / time you see on your system clocks. UNIX used 1970-01-01T00:00:00Z (midnight of January 1, 1970), counting in seconds of UTC - leapseconds. MS-DOS used an epoch of Janurary 1, 1980, and Windows NT systems like XP and Vista I believe: use January 1, 1601, but Windows NT to young to have been a part of the early Internet, which now allows all of us to enjoy our games together! So in honour of the unix time_t value coming up.... and computer geeks everywhere....

Happy 1234567890 day Smile

Hmm, it's 1234512179 last time I looked at time(), so there's still time to celebrate for the next ~15 hours xD

Rouge
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Spidey -- really... You miss me on the start of the first line...

Go chop some wood. BiggrinBiggrinBiggrinBiggrin

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SAS_Carter
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OMG Spidey.... what are you talking about lol....

i struggle to undertand the concept of ironing let alone the numerical representation of a unix system!!! 8O

SAS_JB
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Ok Spidey here is something for you to ponder, and I think you can figure this out quite easily.
Weapon: one .50 PSG-1 with no silencer and scoped.
ammo: .50 Cal. BMG cartridge FMJ round with 800 grains (52 g) of powder.
muzzle velocity: 2895 ft/sec and muzzle energy of 14,895 ft/lbf
barrel length: 45 in
question: impact in velocity and foot pounds at 2500 yds on enemy tango with no armour.
And I have no idea of the answer either....
:roll: Question 8O :idea:

Hunter
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Good question JB Wink ,

i am intent of his answer Smile

(formerly known as SAS_LCpl_Hunter)

Caern
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question: impact in velocity and foot pounds at 2500 yds on enemy tango with no armour.
And I have no idea of the answer either....

I know i dont wanna be that one unarmed tango down the 2500yds range there 8O
Head spreads entirely on the wall behind him...

- He who fears death cannot enjoy life -

SAS_Spawn
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Happy 123456789 right back at yea...b||b

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SAS_JB
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Happy 123456789 right back at yea...b||b

well Spawn you are only off by one 0 but that will change the time line somewhat.... so what actually is the time .?
:roll: WinkTwisted
I will say it's time to bleed some poor tango out!!!

Spidey01
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Weapon: one .50 PSG-1 with no silencer and scoped.
ammo: .50 Cal. BMG cartridge FMJ round with 800 grains (52 g) of powder.
muzzle velocity: 2895 ft/sec and muzzle energy of 14,895 ft/lbf
barrel length: 45 in

question: impact in velocity and foot pounds at 2500 yds on enemy tango with no armour.
And I have no idea of the answer either....
:roll: Question 8O :idea:

My best guess, since I ain't done this kind of stuff in many years....

Let .... Ma = 800 ;;; Bullet mass in grains Mv = 2895 ;;; Muzzle velocity in ft/s Dis = (2500*3) ;;; 2500 yards is = 7500 feet distance SG = 32.174 ;;; rough idea of earth standard gravity in ft/s Grav = SG * 2 ;;; convenience for: 64.34800 gip = 7000 ;;; number of grains in a U.S. pound (Ma * (Mv * Mv)) / (Grav * gip) = 14885.1779 foot pounds out the muzzle ;;; that is: ;;; ((800*(2895*2895)) / ((32.174*2)*7000) = 14885.1779 If the bullet maintained a constant speed of 2895 ft/s, it would hit the target 2500 yards away in approximately 3 seconds and hurt like a son of a gun. Now to try and figure out how much is lost by traveling 2500 yards down range 0/ figure out up how to get energy from muzzle velocity and mass, see above 1/ How do we convert this to foot pounds... see above 2/ figure out what has changed 2500 yards down range we are here 3/ found out about a Ballistic Coefficient (BC), seems it is equal to mass / (drag coefficient * cross sectional area), which is equal to (average density * body length) / drag coefficient. 4/ How do we find the sectional density of our bullet? Cal = 0.50 ;;; any 12.7x99mm bullet is ~1/2 inch in diameter mip = Ma / gip ;;; that is 800 grains / 7000 = 0.114285714 pounds SD = mip / (Cal * Cal) ;;; which is is (800 / 7000) / 0.50 squared ;;; and and should happen to be equal to 0.457142857 f = form factor Cd = Coefficient of Drag for OUR bullet (SD / f) = (mip / (Cd * (Cal * Cal))) 5/ Find out what the heck a drag coefficient is.... along with the bullets form factor. A bullets form factor is Cd of our bullet / Cd of standard 'G' bullet, the Cd of a standard G1 projectile appears to be 0.5190793992194678, but hey... I need to skimp on some of this math. Thank you NASA: "The drag coefficient is a number which aerodynamicists use to model all of the complex dependencies of drag on shape, inclination, and some flow conditions. The drag coefficient Cd is equal to the drag D divided by the quantity: density r times reference area A times one half of the velocity V squared. Cd = D / (.5 * r * V^2 * A)". r = Ma / 3.8976378 ;;; we need to figure out what D and A are: but I don't have the bullet ;;; handy to measure its shape, nor weather conditions at the fire site or ;;; anything.... lol. f = (D / (0.50 * r * (Mv * Mv) * A ) / 0.5190793992194678 BC = SD / f so: (SD / f) = (mip / (Cd * (Cal * Cal))) is: ? But I'll take my best guess.... which is that the bullet would probably drop about 1.5 to 2 inches along the way, and hit the poor guy about 4 seconds later traveling at around 1200 ft/s Which would be: (Ma * (1200*1200) / ((32.174*2) * gip)) = ~2550 foot-pounds But hey.... I suck at math and physics, and I sure ain't been to the marines scout sniper school or anything like that lol. Either way, the guy will have a NICE sized barn door through whatever body part you aim at Smilereferences: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standard_gravity http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ballistic_coefficient http://www.shootingsoftware.com/coefficients.htm http://www.grc.nasa.gov/WWW/K-12/airplane/shaped.html

That is my best guess, using roughly the equivalent to a 3rd graders education in mathematics.... and an inquisitive mind lol.

MB
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OMG

8O

Join the Dark side! We have cookies!

SAS_JB
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" A guess? You, Spidey? that's extraordinary"...somewhat the quote from Capt. James T. Kirk to Spock on figuring out the time space problem for time travel back to present day earth taken from the Star Trek movie, "Star Trek IV; The Voyage Home"
:yoda :mrgreen: :alien :yoda

SAS_Ezbass
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I thought this is an English speakin server.

Ambu
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SAS_Spawn
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"A Hole the size of a Barn Door?", Thats your Answer...
All this quantim Physics to determine a Barn Size Hole...OMG!!!

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SAS_JB
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I didn't know we had any rocket scientists in SAS, well except for when Jay was a member. I guess I should have asked something simple such as the square root of infinity or the propagation of the speed of light to the energy required to reach it or the mass of a black hole maybe. I should have asked the meaning of life but as a human the greatest question of all..... What's for supper?
:roll: Twisted B:

Spidey01
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I'm surprised no one has said, "It's all geek to me", lol.

SAS_JB
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I'm surprised no one has said, "It's all geek to me", lol.

LOL Spidey
ROTFL ROTFL ROTFL ROTFL S:

Ambu
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SAS_JB
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Ambu, check decimal location on your answers.
I just can't believe the drop would be 2430 inches.
Could it be 2.430 in :roll: Dirol 8O

Caern
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the sun, wind, rain or snow or even the shape of the bullet will have an affect on that answer

please elabortate on the effect sun has on a gun/rifleshot; I didnt realise it had any effect on it. All others are quite traceable.
=> and 2430 inches would be quite a lot yeah, though 2.430 inches on 2494 yards distance appear a to be too little to me Wink

- He who fears death cannot enjoy life -

Ambu
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@ caern
What I mean is sun= temperature , humidity, pressure....

@JB
yeah I thought so too. but I have doublechecked my calculations and the answer still stands.
However, after your respond, I surfed around the web and found a online ballistic calculator at
http://www.ammoguide.com

I chose a Laupa 0.510 dia. 800 gr. Bullex-N
And the drop at 2000 yards is 1249 ins

Spidey01
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Fool

MB
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Join the Dark side! We have cookies!

SAS_DUKE
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Back to topic:

I think we all better stick to GMT-time... Blum 3

DUKE, Germany

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Track'em, find'em, kill'em!"